Concretebroker

Blog

article title image

Published on 5/18/2017

Published by marketing@concretebroker.com.au

Here's half a dozen hints to help you before ordering a concrete pump

Concrete pumps can save man hours, time and therefore money, but there are some important things to consider before you hire one


 

 

Concrete boom and line pumps are often necessary in situations where your site is geographically inaccessible, i.e., out the back of your house, on a steep slope, or a long way from the road. They are ideal for when you have large pours, piers, footings and foundations, or are pouring a suspended, i.e., upstairs slab,  But there are a few things to consider before you hire one. 

 

1. Boom or Line Pump? 

Boom pumps are usually quicker than line pumps when it comes to churning your concrete out on site, but they do cost more. Depending on their size and therefore reach, i.e., 28 metre, 39 metre or over 45 metres, they may cost you approximately $50 to $100 more per hour.  Check your site requirements out carefully. How much distance is the farthest corner of the slab to where a concrete truck can park? If its over 40 metres, your going to need a concrete boom pump thats at least 39 metres in length.

Then consider whether there is enough room for a concrete boom pump to park on your site. They have long legs that straddle out either side of their cab chassis and therefore you need to allow for at least four to five metres width in your driveway, or on site otherwise they may need to park on the street. If so is that possible? Do you have traffic control? Is there room on the street? Off street parking? If the answer is no you may need a line pump, as they are similar to a small truck in size, and only require about two and a half metres width when parking on your site.  

 

2.  Do I require a different concrete mix design?

Every concrete plant has their own unique concrete mix designs. But as a rule of thumb in Australia most ready mix concrete plants place some additional cement and flyash in their concrete pump mixes, to increase the flowability and therefore the pumpability of your concrete on site. Dry concrete with heavy, large and elongated aggregates isn't ideal when it comes to concrete pumping. The resultant pump blockages that may arise can add to your bottom line costs as it takes additional time to unblock them. And time costs money when it comes to concrete pumps. Therefore we recommend you let the batch plant know when ordering your concrete that your using a concrete pump and require a pump (P) mix. 


Be sure to let them know if its a line pump too. Line pumps may utilise a small line, i.e., a 2 inch hose when pumping, in which case small aggregate stone is often required in your mix, together with even more cement and flyash than would otherwise be required in a normal (N) mix design. Remember too that because there may be more cement and flyash required, your concrete is probably going to cost a few dollars more per cubic metre.

 

3.  What about power lines or other onsite obstacles?

Concrete pumps are pretty heavy and therefore if its been wet, or if you have a weak sub surface i.e., fill, they may be easily bogged, or at worst tip over. They require a hard stand to park on, particularly boom pumps whose legs carry the weight of the heavy crane above.
Whilst boom pumps require planty of room. Power lines and other on site services may prove to be obstacles for your boom pump operator. Even if he or she is ticketed to operate around power (i.e., has sat for an overhead power and lines induction), there may physically not be enough room for them to logistically negotiate their crane under or around the power. You might need to reconsider and step back to the line pump option.

 

 

4.  What if I under, or even over order the amount of concrete required?

Making sure you order appropriately is even more important when you are ordering a concrete pump in addition to your concrete. Having concreters hanging around waiting for your final load, i.e., your plus or message, is bad enough, but when a pumps sitting waiting on site, you start to feel your back pocket burning. Therefore its important to measure up correctly during the third and second last loads. Then give the batch plant advance notice of the amount of concrete required to finish your job. 

Remember its often less expensive to slightly over order when it comes to concrete quantities, than to pay the additional pump and concreter hours associated with waiting on site for additional concrete, in situations where you have under ordered

 

5. What if the concrete pump breaks down? 

If your ordering the concrete from the batch plant chances are you are paying for it. Therefore you are liable for it even in circumstances when the concrete pump blocks, breaks down, or is late to site. Its important to have positive communication with the concrete pumping company and your concrete batch plant at all times. Make sure there is a back up plan in place for emergencies and delays. Most experienced concrete pumping firms have access to other concrete pumps in times of need, but it may be prudent to consider "what if" before your pour, as opposed to during it. Especially if you are pouring at 7am and all the other concrete pumps are busy, or in situations where you are miles from another concrete pumping yard.

 

6. Where does the concrete pump wash out?

The concrete pump has a hopper that can have up to and over .2 cubic metres left in it at the conclusion of your concrete pour. This needs to be discharged either on site, back at a batch plant, at a recycle depot, or somewhere. In other words it cannot be illegally dumped, and if it needs to be tipped, washed out or discharged off site, its probably going to cost you money. So if you don't have room on site to take this excess concrete e.g., in another slab or a designated wash out area, you need to talk with the concrete pumping company to arrange where the hopper is to be washed out, and therefore what your additional costs shall be

 

For more helpful hints when ordering concrete and choosing a concrete batch plant, check out these related articles at:

Did you know there's a dozen things to consider when ordering your next concrete pour : http://www.concretebroker.com.au/Blog/View/20

 

I need concrete, how do I choose a concrete plant? : http://www.concretebroker.com.au/Blog/View/24

 

Or if you have require a concrete pump to access a shed where a low entry point and long reach is required, you might like to consider hiring a five (5) stage boom pump from our member http://www.concretebroker.com.au/Hunterconcretepumphire

 

Concretebroker provides the tools, information and resources to purchase and pour concrete.
Find what you need to know for your next concreting project here 

 

  HOW MUCH CONCRETE, STEEL AND ACCESSORIES DO I NEED?
   And how much do concrete slabs cost in Australia?

 

 

 

 

  WHAT MAKES A GOOD CONCRETER?
   Are you cut out to be a good concreter?

 

 

 

 

  HOW TO POUR A CONCRETE DRIVEWAY IN THE USA
  How to Pour a Concrete Driveway by Sciulli Concrete
  

 

 

 

 

  
  I'VE NOW GOT PROBLEMS WITH MY SLAB
  What was the cause?
  And how can I prevent it from happening next time?

 

 

 

  HERE'S TEN "DON'T DO'S" WHEN IT COMES TO POURING AND FINISHING CONCRETE
  Inadequate concrete finishing can lead to surface imperfections

 

 

 

 

  WHY DID MY CONCRETE CRACK?
  Who's fault is it?

 

 

 

 

  

  HOW TO POUR A CONCRETE SLAB BY THE FAMILY HANDYMAN
  Watch this clip for some Do It Yourself tips ideal for your next pour

 

 

 

  
  HOW TO BUILD FORMWORK
  With our friends at Bunnings Warehouse we'll show you the basics for building formwork for a concrete slab

  

 

 


  HOW TO LAY A CONCRETE SLAB
  Follow Cement Australia's comprehensive step by step guide to laying your own slab

 

 

 

 TO SEAL OR NOT TO SEAL
 Thinking of sealing or resealing your concrete? Find out what you need to know here

 

 

 

 

  DID YOU KNOW THERE’S A DOZEN THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN ORGANISING YOUR CONCRETE POUR?
  Check in with concretebroker’s dozen before your next concrete pour. Before it’s too late

 

 

 

 

  

  I NEED CONCRETE. HOW DO I CHOOSE A CONCRETE PLANT?
  Concretebroker gives you half a dozen things to look out for when choosing a  concrete plant

 

 

 

  SHOULD I POUR CONCRETE TODAY?
  Every day concretors and construction managers tear their hair out unsure of whether they should or shouldn't pour concrete due to the weather  
  conditions

 

 

 

 

 SO TELL ME, IS CONCRETE ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE?
 Now running the Association’s National Precast Concrete Association office from  Adelaide, Sarah Bachman gives us some insight

 

 

 

  
  CAN I POUR CONCRETE IN THE RAIN?
  We hear much these days about pouring concrete on hot, dry windy day. But what about when it's raining?

 

 

 

  THE CONCRETEBROKER DICTIONARY VOLUME 1 (AUSTRALIAN EDITION)
 Your comprehensive guide to the most popular abbreviations, definitions, phrases, slang and terms used within the industry.

 

 

 

 

  TEN (THATS 10) MINUTE CRACK REPAIR. YOUR'E KIDDING AREN'T YOU? Cracks in Concrete - forget about them in ten minutes - just watch this
  video

 

 

 

 

  

  WOOD CONCRETE - HOW TO MAKE CONCRETE LOOK LIKE WOOD FLOORING
   Is that concrete? Or a timber floor? Watch this video to find out....

 

 

 

  HOW TO LAY A SMALL CONCRETE PAD
  Another look at how to lay a small concrete slab from DIY Network.com

 

 

 

 

 LETS TALK ABOUT STEEL FIBRES
 Mesh sits in the middle of your concrete slab and is quite cumbersome. What do steel fibres do?

 

 

 

 

  EVER THOUGHT ABOUT PLACING A PATTERN ON YOUR CONCRETE?
  BRICKFORM show how to properly stamp concrete from start to finish

 

 

 

 

  HOW TO POUR AND FINISH CONCRETE
 YouTube handyman and alround good guy Russ Richards shows us how to finish a slab properly

 

 

 

 

  NEED A CONCRETE TEST
  Check in with Valley Civilab, our latest member for all your concrete, soil and aggregate testing needs

 

 

 

 

  

  CONCRETE CAN BE A SPONGE FOR AIR POLLUTION
  Concrete surfaces can remove sulfur dioxide, a major contributor to air pollution, from the air, new research suggests

 

 

 

  
  FLOOR COATINGS EXPLAINED
  An overview of floor coatings and a quick look at whats happening in the floor coating market overseas

 

 

 

 
 COLORED CONCRETE IS TAKING OVER AND WE'RE VERY INTO IT
  Pink? Blue? A watercolory ivory? You choose!

 

 

 

 

  TALK TO ME ABOUT CONCRETE AND STEEL ACCESSORIES
  What accessories are used in the standard concrete slab? And where do I buy them from?

 

 

 

  BEWARE THE COLD JOINT
  Cold joints in concrete are your worst nightmare. But how do they occur and how do we prevent them from happening?

 

 

 

 

 


Tags: boom pump concrete concrete Australia concrete pump concrete pumping line pump pump mix small line mix


This article was written by marketing@concretebroker.com.au all rights reserved. The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of concretebroker.com